If the label says 5 grams of fat per serving, then it's 5 grams of fat per whatever amount constitutes one "serving." The manufacturer does whatever it takes to get away with naming as few calories (or as few grams of fat) as possible for the "serving size."

A weight-conscious person may not buy a gourmet fiber cookie that has 400 calories.
The manufacturer gets around this obstacle by listing it as only 200 calories-as long as the "serving size" is listed as half the cookie!

Many serving sizes are only half or one-third the item, even though the item is only one of whatever it is: one cookie, one whole-grain or nut bar, one muffin, one tiny bag of munchies. Check out the serving sizes of some cereals! Many serving sizes are three-fourths cup. That's four small spoonfuls!

Ingredients are listed in descending order of how much is in the product (by weight). Note that with non-diet soda, fruit-flavored beverages, and many sweetened foods like apple sauce, cereals, yogurt, and granola bars, that "corn syrup" or "fructose" (sugars) are often listed within the first three ingredients.

"Low-fat" means that the food has 3 grams or less fat per whatever serving is designated on the label. So if only four "Cheese-Bits" crackers contain 2.9 grams of fat, the manufacturer can then get away with putting "low-fat" on the box, as long as the label says that four of the tiny crackers make one serving. The regular-fat variety of "Cheese-Bits" may actually list six of the crackers as one serving. The ingredients may very well be identical for both "varieties." The only difference is the color of the box! This deception also applies to "low calorie."

"Lower fat" and "reduced fat" do not mean low in fat. These relative terms only mean that this version isn't as fattening as the original variety.

There is no standard definition to the word, natural, when applied to drinks and foods other than meat and poultry. A manufacturer can stick "natural flavor" on most any food item.

If "natural" turns up on a package of meat or poultry, it means that the product is free of artificial flavor, artificial color and unnatural preservatives. There's also no legal definition for "real fruit juice."

The USDA Organic seal indicates that a product is at least 95 percent organic. But this seal is voluntary and is not on all 100 percent organic foods. Some ingredient lists identify which specific components are organic, but this doesn't mean that the entire food item is organic.

Some labels include names such as natural, free-range, and hormone-free. This does not mean that the food is organic.

Original article by Jillita Horton
The manufacturer gets around this obstacle by listing it as only 200 calories-as long as the "serving size" is listed as half the cookie!

Many serving sizes are only half or one-third the item, even though the item is only one of whatever it is: one cookie, one whole-grain or nut bar, one muffin, one tiny bag of munchies. Check out the serving sizes of some cereals! Many serving sizes are three-fourths cup. That's four small spoonfuls!

Ingredients are listed in descending order of how much is in the product (by weight). Note that with non-diet soda, fruit-flavored beverages, and many sweetened foods like apple sauce, cereals, yogurt, and granola bars, that "corn syrup" or "fructose" (sugars) are often listed within the first three ingredients.

"Low-fat" means that the food has 3 grams or less fat per whatever serving is designated on the label. So if only four "Cheese-Bits" crackers contain 2.9 grams of fat, the manufacturer can then get away with putting "low-fat" on the box, as long as the label says that four of the tiny crackers make one serving. The regular-fat variety of "Cheese-Bits" may actually list six of the crackers as one serving. The ingredients may very well be identical for both "varieties." The only difference is the color of the box! This deception also applies to "low calorie."

"Lower fat" and "reduced fat" do not mean low in fat. These relative terms only mean that this version isn't as fattening as the original variety.

There is no standard definition to the word, natural, when applied to drinks and foods other than meat and poultry. A manufacturer can stick "natural flavor" on most any food item.

If "natural" turns up on a package of meat or poultry, it means that the product is free of artificial flavor, artificial color and unnatural preservatives. There's also no legal definition for "real fruit juice."

The USDA Organic seal indicates that a product is at least 95 percent organic. But this seal is voluntary and is not on all 100 percent organic foods. Some ingredient lists identify which specific components are organic, but this doesn't mean that the entire food item is organic.

Some labels include names such as natural, free-range, and hormone-free. This does not mean that the food is organic..
   copyright fitstop fitness for women 2010
HOW TO MAKE SENSE OF FOOD LABELS
Article provided by
Life 123 - Answers at the speed of life
fitstopapril2016055002.png
nutrition
fitstopapril2016055002.png
exercise
fitstopapril2016055002.png
kids health
fitstopapril2016055002.png
fit tips
fitstopapril2016055002.png
Funny & Interesting
who we are
what we offer
all the extras
MORE
MORE
MORE
price list
location
services
classes
recipes
articles
fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif
home
go shopping
articles
fit tips
eating disorders
photo album
recipes
facebook
client business
testimonials
links
latest news
community service
fitstopapril2016036001.gif fitstopapril2016036001.gif
newsletters
inspiration / motivation